Dr. Sandeep Kapoor – Skin Cancer Prevention and Awareness at Bonnaroo Music Festival

Dr. Sandeep Kapoor with the T.J. Martell Foundation at Bonnaroo

I would like to extend a warm thank you to Laura Heatherly of the T.J. Martell Foundation for asking me to conduct a skin cancer awareness program at the Bonnaroo Music Festival in Manchester,Tennessee.

As a primary care physician, I truly enjoy reaching out to the community to educate the public on the importance of cancer prevention and early detection. We had an enthusiastic audience that spanned many age groups who were interested in learning how to protect themselves from the dangers of the sun and how to check themselves for early signs of skin cancer.

On behalf of he board of directors of the Ronnie James Dio Stand Up and Shout Cancer Fund, we appreciate our collaboration with the T.J. Martell Foundation and plan to be present at many more outdoor music festivals to spread the word about skin cancer prevention.

Cancer prevention and early detection saves lives!

Check Yourself for Cancer Today!

Sandeep Kapoor, MD

Co-Founder/Medical Director

The Ronnie James Dio Stand Up And Shout Cancer Fund

www.diocancerfund.org

But Tony Martell Knew Me: Guest Blog Post

Bob Brown is an inspirational speaker and the author of “The Ride Of My Life”, the widely acclaimed memoir of his journey with pancreatic cancer.

Being diagnosed with cancer is a devastating and lonely moment.  No matter how sizable your support team, or who is in the room with you at the time, when the Doctor says “You have stage 3 inoperable pancreatic cancer,” you alone are forced to absorb that most difficult news.  My wife Linda was with me that fateful day in March 2008, and considering the immediate and overwhelming fog that overtook my brain, I was lucky to have her to physically compose and escort me back to our home.  During that ride in the car, my mind searched for the beginnings of a plan.  I knew that we would need to do a lot of research, reach out to a bucket load of doctors, and look for support wherever we could find it.  As I sat in the car watching the road go by, I had no idea who Tony Martell was….but he knew me.

The doctors explained that my treatment options were few, the success rate even less and that the short term prognosis was very grim.  They wouldn’t even discuss the long term anything.  They created a plan to try and shrink the tumor before it spread.  They hoped to get me to an operable status so that the toxic villain could be cut from my body.  The treatments called for chemotherapy, to be followed up with radiation supplemented with additional chemo.  I was determined and my spirits were high.  Those of my doctors were anything but.  Clearly this was going to be a long shot, against the cancer with the lowest survival rate.  Looking forward even a little bit meant I was moving into miracle territory.  I didn’t know a whole lot about miracles….but Tony Martell had seen quite a few of them.

I began the treatments with a fierce positive attitude, determined that I would beat the odds.  I prepared for the side effects which I was told would be bad.  That wasn’t entirely true, as they were actually much worse.  As the treatments extended into weeks and then months, I was rendered pretty much useless.  I made it to the treatments, but spent the remainder of time in bed totally exhausted.  Tony Martell spent those months just as he had most of the past 30+ years, tirelessly leading an organization dedicated to raising funds and supporting research to rid the world of leukemia, AIDS, and all types of cancer.

Well the treatments didn’t work.  The tumor shrunk only a little bit, and my oncologist and surgeon delivered the bleak news: “There’s nothing more we can do for you.”  My wife and I could not accept that, and we searched far and wide for other opinions.  We found a surgeon at Columbia/New York Presbyterian Hospital who saw my case differently and was willing to expand the boundaries of what was normally attempted.  If I was willing to accept the elevated risks of this surgery, then yes, he was willing to try.  I agreed, and he performed a fourteen hour “whipple” surgery that saved my life.  Today, five years after diagnosis, I am one of the few…a long term survivor of pancreatic cancer.

It shouldn’t come as a surprise that Columbia/NYP is one of the hospitals receiving funding from the T.J. Martell Foundation to advance innovative research and treatments.     Nor should it come as a surprise that I was helped by a foundation with which I had had no previous contact.  For as a cancer patient in need of the best innovative care, The T.J. Martell Foundation knew me.

When I was asked to speak at the Annual Gala in New York last year, it was my opportunity to give back to Mr. Martell and show my gratitude for everything he does.  I approached him, stuck out my hand and introduced myself.  He looked at me with a big smile and said “Hi Bob Brown, I know all about your story; you’re one of the luckiest guys in the world.  You beat pancreatic cancer.”

Like I said, I didn’t know Tony Martell, but he sure knew me.

Bob Brown is an inspirational speaker and the author of “The Ride Of My Life”, the widely acclaimed memoir of his journey with pancreatic cancer.

Guest Blog Post Follow-Up – A Story of Hope

Hi Everyone!

My name is Cameron, and some of you may remember seeing my guest post a while back about my time as a caregiver to my wife, Heather.  She was diagnosed with a very rare and deadly cancer called mesothelioma 7 years ago, less than four months after giving birth to our daughter. Despite the usually bleak odds that come with a mesothelioma diagnosis, she was able to fight back and eventually defeat this terrible disease. Today, she remains healthy and cancer free.  We now both work hard to raise awareness about mesothelioma, and also to provide hope and support to all those currently fighting cancer today.  We recently participated in this short video about our story, and I hope you’ll take a few minutes to watch it and share it with someone facing a difficult struggle of their own.  With hope, the odds don’t matter!

A World Without Cancer – Guest Post

Dr. Margaret Cuomo is the author of “A World Without Cancer: The Making of a New Cure and the Real Promise of Prevention;” she is a board-certified radiologist who served as an attending physician in diagnostic radiology at North Shore University Hospital in Manhasset, N.Y. for many years. She was the keynote speaker at the T.J. Martell Foundation’s inaugural Women of Influence Awards at Riverpark in New York City.

We are honored to share her perspective here on Angelina Jolie’s courageous decision regarding the discovery of her BRCA1 genetic mutation and subsequent bilateral (aka “double”) mastectomy, as well as the implications for the cancer community.

Dr. Margaret Cuomo is the author of “A World Without Cancer: The Making of a New Cure and the Real Promise of Prevention.”

Angelina Jolie has my admiration for her courage in publicly describing her decision to undergo a bilateral (aka “double”) mastectomy. Her BRCA1 genetic mutation significantly increases her risk of developing breast cancer and ovarian cancer.

According to Jolie’s New York Times op-ed piece, her doctors estimated that she has an 87 percent risk of breast cancer and a 50 percent risk of ovarian cancer. Women who have inherited BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations account for 5 to 10 percent of breast cancers and 10 to 15 percent of ovarian cancers (for white women) in the United States, according to the National Cancer Institute.

Knowing that her own mother died at the age of 56 following her battle with cancer, Angelina Jolie, the mother of six children, decided to be pro-active, and decided to sharply reduce her risk of breast cancer by undergoing the mastectomy.

The question that I hope many women are asking is: “Is this the best that we can do in the 21st century?” After 41 years and more than 90 billion dollars spent since the War on Cancer was declared, we should expect more effective and less invasive solutions to reducing breast cancer, and all cancers.

Are the National Cancer Institute and the pharmaceutical industry committing enough of their intellectual and financial resources to the discovery of safe, new ways of detecting breast cancer and ovarian cancer in their earliest stages?  If a patient has a BRCA1 or BRACA2 mutation, are there techniques available to “turn-off” the faulty genes?

Is there a sense of urgency about finding new tests to detect breast cancer and ovarian cancer, and other cancers, that do not involve radiation – a known carcinogen?

The prevention of cancer should be our ultimate goal and it should have the full benefit of the National Cancer Institute’s and industry’s vast resources.

Our children are our future, and we should expect that their generation will prevent cancer without the traumatic solution that Angelina Jolie felt obliged to accept.