The Inspirational Story of Cancer Patient Ben Jumper

BenHe supported cancer research for years — and now, Music Row leader Ben Jumper is fighting the disease himself.

“Your whole life changes the minute the word cancer is said.”

Surgeons removed half his kidney, and doctors, after five years of clean scans, started to use the word survivor.

Jumper started giving talks to raise awareness about cancer research, and to offer them hope.

The fundraisers he organized for T.J. Martell Foundation became much more personal.

And then, five months ago, the devastating lung cancer diagnosis – and 33 radiation treatments and 11 rounds of chemotherapy.

“I really in the last year can say how blessed I’ve been because I’m truly living my dream. I know it’s a cliché, but I get to say it and mean it. I have my days of depression through all this. But I love every moment I get to spend with the family,” says longtime T.J. Martell Foundation board member Ben Jumper.

Click here to read the full article in The Tennessean.

We are Proud of our Commitment to Excellence

BlogThe T.J. Martell Foundation has contributed to many scientific achievements in leukemia, cancer and AIDS research over the past forty years. We are also focused on funding the brightest minds that will be the leaders in scientific research of tomorrow.

To read more about the life-saving research we are funding with your support, please click here.

Rest In Peace

This weekend, longtime beloved ESPN anchor Stuart Scott lost his third bout with cancer, leaving behind two beautiful daughters and countless friends, family members, colleagues and fans across the country. He faced cancer with bravery and inspired many who also face the disease.

So today we choose to honor him by sharing what we think is his most touching quote about cancer and life: “When you die, it does not mean that you lose to cancer. You beat cancer by how you live, why you live and the manner in which you live.”

Stuart Scott was 49, and his journey through cancer treatment was detailed in The New York Times. “Over the years, he entertained us, and in the end, he inspired us — with courage and love. Michelle and I offer our thoughts and prayers to his family, friends, and colleagues,” said President Obama.

Congratulations are in Order!

Every year Billboard releases its prestigious list of Women In Music: The Most Powerful Executives in the Industry, and every year several of our board members are included for being “ground-breakers and game changers.” This year our board members Jody Gerson, Julie Swidler, Jennifer Breithaupt and Sharon Dastur as well as our New York Honors Gala honoree Marsha Vlasik were all listed. We are so honored to work with these incredibly hard-working women to continue our vital leukemia, cancer and AIDS research.

To read the full list, please visit billboard.com.

HPV-Positive Head and Neck Cancer Patients May be Safely Treated with Lower Radiation Dose

A new study suggests that lowering the dose of radiation therapy for some head and neck cancer patients may improve outcomes and cause fewer long-term side effects.

The research was presented by lead author Anthony Cmelak, M.D., professor of Radiation Oncology at Vanderbilt-Ingram Cancer Center (VICC), during the 50th annual meeting of the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO), held recently in Chicago.

The study focused on patients with newly-diagnosed oropharyngeal cancers related to the human papilloma virus (HPV). More than two-thirds of new head and neck cancer patients have HPV-positive tumors and the number of these patients is on the rise. Cmelak’s prior cooperative group study found that patients with HPV-positive oropharyngeal cancer have significantly longer survival rates than patients whose tumors are HPV negative.

For the new study, 80 HPV-positive patients with stage III, or IVa,b squamous cell cancer of the oropharynx received induction chemotherapy, including paclitaxel, cisplatin and cetuximab.

After chemotherapy, 62 of the patients showed no sign of cancer and were assigned to receive a 25 percent lower dose of intensity-modulated radiation therapy – an advanced technology that targets the radiation beam more accurately to treat the tumor without harming surrounding tissue. The rest of the patients received a standard IMRT dose. The drug cetuximab was also given to both groups of patients along with the IMRT treatment.

Two years after treatment, the survival for the low-dose IMRT patients was 93 percent.  Those who did not have complete resolution of cancer following induction and went on to get full-dose radiation had an 87 percent two-year survival. Eighty percent of the low-dose patients and 65 percent of standard IMRT patients also showed no evidence of tumor recurrence.  Ninety-six percent of those who had minimal or no smoking history had no evidence of tumor recurrence after two years following treatment, and long-term side effects were minimal.

The investigators concluded that patients with HPV-positive cancer who had excellent responses to induction chemotherapy followed by a reduced dose IMRT and cetuximab experienced high rates of tumor control and very low side effects particularly for those with a minimal smoking history.

Treating tumors in the delicate head and neck region often causes side effects that can be troublesome and long-lasting, including difficulty swallowing, speech impairment, dry mouth, problems with taste and thyroid issues, so any therapy option that reduces these side effects can have an impact on patient quality of life.

“Treatment for head and neck cancer can be quite grueling, so it’s very encouraging to see we can safely dial back treatment for patients with less aggressive disease and an overall good prognosis, particularly for young patients who have many years to deal with long-term side effects,” said Cmelak.

He noted that lower-dose IMRT is not recommended for patients with HPV-negative cancer or larger tumors.

The authors note that further studies of reduced-dose IMRT in HPV-positive patients are warranted.

Other investigators include Jill Gilbert, M.D., VICC; Shuli Li, Ph.D., Dana Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, Massachusetts; Shanthi Marur, M.D., William Westra, M.D., Christine Chung, M.D., The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland;  Weiqiang Zhao, M.D., Ph.D., Maura Gillison, M.D., Ph.D., The Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio; Julie Bauman, M.D., Robert Ferris, M.D., University of Pittsburgh Cancer Institute; Lynne Wagner, Ph.D., Feinberg School of Medicine, Northwestern University, Chicago, Illinois; David Trevarthen, M.D., Colorado Cancer Research Program, Denver;  A. Demetrios Colevas, M.D., Stanford University, California; Balkrishna Jahagirdar, M.D., HealthPartners and Regions Cancer Care Center, St. Paul, Minnesota;  Barbara Burtness, M.D., Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.

Funding was provided by The National Cancer Institute, a division of the National Institutes of Health (CDR0000665170).

 

Excerpt: Colon Cancer Screening Saves Lives

Widespread screening for colorectal cancer has helped prevent an estimated half-million cases of the disease since the mid- 1970s, a new study suggests.

At a time when screening for many kinds of cancer is being questioned, the findings underscore the importance of screening for colorectal cancer in saving lives, said the senior author of the study, Dr. James Yu, an assistant professor of therapeutic radiology at Yale School of Medicine.

Colonoscopies, beginning at age 50, are considered the gold standard in colon cancer screening, although other techniques, like fecal occult blood testing, can detect some cancers.

 To read the full article in The New York Times, please click here.