Q&A With Women of Influence NY Honoree Ruby Marchand

ruby marchand grammy FINALS-3The T.J. Martell Foundation is thrilled to honor Ruby Marchand at the 4th Annual Women of Influence Luncheon in New York. Ruby is the Vice President of International Repertoire Development at Warner Music Group, as well as the Vice Chair of the Recording Academy. Below, Ruby shares her feelings on being a “Woman of Influence,” as well as some pieces of advice for other women. You can learn more about the T.J. Martell Foundation’s Women of Influence luncheon in New York at www.tjmfwomenofinfluence.org.

  1. What does it mean to you to be chosen as a Woman of Influence by the T.J. Martell Foundation?

In the music industry, the T.J. Martell Foundation has always symbolized the pinnacle of personal achievement and a high level of caring for others. I believe that there are many forms of care, including mentoring, philanthropy, and personal service. I am sincerely touched and honored to be a Women Of Influence this year.

  1. What piece of advice would you give to young women today to inspire them to follow their dreams?

I always advise young women to remain true to themselves. Live freely, intuitively, and keep your antennae up so that you are aware of the opportunities that surround us all.

  1. What steps do you take to make health and wellness a priority in your life?

When you’re juggling family, friends, work, travel, and all the responsibilities that come with a full life, it is almost irresistible to put your own health last. Everything else seems to take priority. I made a decision many years ago to make self-care a top priority in my life. This means that I listen to my mind and my body. I eat well, take long walks, and see my circle of doctors regularly. I have checkups on time and work my schedule around them. I smile a lot and gravitate towards humor and positivity. While we can’t control what life brings to us, we can react with strength, balance, resilience and perspective.

Q&A With Women Of Influence NY Honoree Debra Joester

Debra Joester HeadshotMeet another Women of Influence New York honoree: Debra Joester! Debra is President and CEO of The Joester Loria Group, which is the architect of dozens of award-winning strategic brand extension programs as well as licensing innovation in entertainment, emerging sectors and special events. We spoke with Debra about her involvement in this year’s luncheon and awards that will benefit the Foundation’s breast and ovarian cancer research programs. See what Debra has to say below, and learn more about the 4th Annual Women of Influence Luncheon at the Plaza Hotel in New York City by visiting www.tjmfwomenofinfluence.org.

  1. What does it mean to you to be chosen as a Woman of Influence by the T.J. Martell Foundation?

I was honored and humbled when I learned I was selected to be recognized as a Woman of Influence in 2016.The TJ Martell Foundation is important to me on a very personal level. As a parent, Tony Martell’s story and commitment to finding a cure is truly inspirational.  As a woman and mother of a daughter, I consider finding a cure for breast and ovarian cancer of the utmost importance. Over the years, I have lost dear friends to breast cancer and to AIDS, but I am hopeful as I watch friends winning their battle against those diseases every day.  Those victories and finding a cure are supported by funding the TJ Martell Foundation provides for research.  Beyond the work TJ Martell does, I am thrilled to reinforce the message of hope and empowerment that is the centerpiece of the TJ Martell’s Women of Influence luncheon.  Past honorees have truly inspired me and I hope I can use my story and experience to do the same.

  1. What piece of advice would you give to young women today to inspire them to follow their dreams?

Follow your passions:  Find something you are passionate about and do it as well as you can.

Celebrate being smart: Be confident in what you know and do well.  Take ownership of your accomplishments.

Curiosity keeps you relevant:  Never stop learning or asking questions, and stay informed about our complex and ever-changing world.

Develop People Skills:   Be a team player and a good collaborator.  Build relationships and trust with your peers, as well as those that are senior and junior.

Don’t forget your personal life:  Make time for family, friends, fitness and fun.  Balance is hard to find but it is important to make balance a priority.

Give Back:  Mentor, volunteer, and join in whenever you can. There are so many ways to participate in causes that are important to you!

  1. What steps do you take to make health and wellness a priority in your life?

I love my hectic New York lifestyle but it can make healthy choices more challenging.  Work and personal commitments fill my days, so creating healthy habits is really important to me. I am a foodie, but I find eating more fruit and vegetables makes me feel better and still gives me delicious food options. I have never smoked and don’t drink soda, don’t eat sugary foods or indulge in unhealthy lifestyle choices. I believe women cannot afford to miss their annual visits to their doctors, so I schedule my check-ups and doctor’s visits the way I would schedule any other important meeting or event.  I play tennis in the summer and walk all year around but I don’t make enough time to go to the gym.  I am challenging myself to make time for exercise but it’s not easy!

 

Q&A With Women of Influence NY Honoree Ariane Duarte

Ariane DuarteFans of Bravo TV’s “Top Chef” may recognize Ariane Duarte, who competed on the show’s 5th season. This past year, the chef also competed on the show “Beat Bobby Flay” and was victorious! Ariane is also the owner and chef of Ariane’s Kitchen & Bar in New Jersey. She, as well as six other outstanding women, will be honored and celebrated at the 4th Annual Women of Influence Luncheon in New York on May 13th.

Get to know a little more about Ariane:

  1. What does it mean to you to be chosen as a Woman of Influence by the T.J. Martell Foundation?

The question gives me pause. Without thinking that I am influencing anyone, I just carry on, doing what I love, doing what I care about for those I hope will enjoy what I create.

I am a chef. I try to feed the stomach and if I feed the soul, then I am doing more than I hoped.  If my attitude, my business, my food inspire others to follow their talent, how lucky am I!  

  1. What piece of advice would you give to young women today to inspire them to follow their dreams?

Forget dreams.  Follow your talents. Young women – ask questions, Ask questions. Ask questions. It’s ok to hear “no”.  It’s the way you’ll grow.

  1. What steps do you take to make health and wellness a priority in your life?

Annual checks-ups and listen to your body!

Support Ariane and our other 6 honorees by making a tax-deductible donation or purchasing a ticket to the New York Women of Influence luncheon. Funds raised will benefit the T.J. Martell Foundation’s breast and ovarian cancer research programs. www.tjmfwomenofinfluence.org

 

Monday, April 7th is World Health Day

Dr. Margaret Cuomo is the author of “A World Without Cancer: The Making of a New Cure and the Real Promise of Prevention.”

World Health Day, April 7th, is a great opportunity to focus our attention on what should be an American priority: cancer prevention.

Scientific evidence tells us that over 50 percent of all cancers are preventable by applying what we know right now. Attention to diet, exercise, avoiding alcohol, protecting our skin from the sun, managing stress and, of course, ending smoking all contribute to significantly reduce cancer risk. These are the “broad strokes” of cancer prevention. The devil is in the details, and people need to know which foods, what kind of exercise, how to manage stress, etc. There are highly-effective strategies to prevent cancer, but we need to learn them. We should be teaching our children about the kinds of foods that reduce cancer risk and encouraging them to stay physically active to prevent cancer and other diseases. Anti-smoking education should focus on the young as well as adults, emphasizing that “It’s not cool to smoke, because there’s nothing cool about cancer.”

Learning that whole grains, legumes, fruits and vegetables can help prevent many cancers, including cancers of the prostate, breast, mouth, throat, esophagus, lung, colon, kidney, pancreas, thyroid, gallbladder, and probably other cancer types is a powerful lesson that can have a significant impact on children’s lives. In many cases, children who have been taught about cancer-preventing strategies can become the role models and teachers for their parents.

Our fruits, vegetables and grains should be free of harmful pesticides that promote cancer. Our cattle, poultry and fish should not be exposed to antibiotics or hormones that will be harmful to their human consumers. Our personal care products, such as shampoo and deodorant and toothpaste; cosmetics, such as lipstick, mascara and eyeliner; and our household cleaning products should be free of chemicals that disrupt our hormones, and increase our cancer risk.

The scientific and medical community, including the World Health Organization and the American Association of Obstetricians and Gynecologists and the American Reproductive Society, are speaking out against the harmful chemicals in our environment.

In a joint Committee Opinion issued by the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists (The College) and the American Society for Reproductive Medicine in September 2013, obstetricians and gynecologists were urged to advocate for government policy changes to identify and reduce exposure to toxic environmental agents.

Among the reproductive and health problems associated with exposure to these toxic chemicals, these powerful medical groups listed childhood cancers, miscarriage and stillbirth impaired fetal growth and low birth weight, preterm birth, birth defects, cognitive/intellectual impairment and thyroid problems.

In 2010, the President’s Cancer Panel issued a scathing report entitled, Reducing Environmental Cancer Risk: What We Can Do Now,” in which it stated: “The true burden of environmentally induced cancer has been grossly underestimated.”

It takes a village to support cancer prevention. Government and the industries producing our food, personal care products and cosmetics, household and industrial cleaning products, fertilizers and pesticides should be partners in the effort to ensure that our food is pure and healthful, and that the products used on our bodies and our farms, in our homes, schools and businesses aren’t cancer-causing. Less Cancer, a not-for-profit organization founded by Bill Couzens, seeks to educate individuals and raise awareness that results in the protection of human health, the environment, and our economy. Less Cancer’s work on health and the environment spans a wide range of issues, including specific contaminants, pollution sources and also healthy lifestyle choices, such as diet, exercise, and smoking cessation. While we work to protect all communities, our approach is particularly relevant to at-risk populations, such as children, low-income communities, and workers. Less Cancer’s ultimate goal is to reduce incidences of diagnosed cancer in all people. As a Less Cancer board member, I am honored to be a part of this vital mission.

A World Without Cancer, the book I wrote in 2012, is my personal journey with cancer as a doctor, a diagnostic radiologist and experiencing cancer’s horrific effects on my patients, friends, and family. The good news is that cancer is not an inevitability for us. Whether we are adults or children, members of the media or medical community, government, industry or cancer advocacy group, we can all contribute to a healthier environment, a stronger, more vibrant society, and ultimately, to a world without cancer. If we fully dedicate ourselves to the prevention of cancer, this impossible dream will become a reality.

Margaret I. Cuomo, M.D., is a board-certified radiologist and served as an attending physician in diagnostic radiology at North Shore University Hospital in Manhasset, N.Y. for many years. Specializing in body imaging, involving CT, Ultrasound, MRI and interventional procedures, much of her practice was dedicated to the diagnosis of cancer and AIDS. She is the daughter of former New York Governor Mario Cuomo and Mrs. Matilda Cuomo and sister to Governor Andrew Cuomo and ABC’s Chris Cuomo. She resides in New York. Cuomo’s book, A World Without Cancer, was published October 2012 by Rodale.

Women of Influence

 

GRAMMY nominated musician Elle Varner (l), honoree Joanne Camuti, Director American Airlines, honoree Lori Stokes, Eyewitness News anchor for WABC, honoree, famed columnist and founder of wowowow.com, Liz Smith, honoree Marcie Allen, President of MAC Presents and Director/Beach 119, honoree Dr. Margaret I. Cuomo, the event’s host and Weekend TODAY personality Jenna Wolfe and Laura Heatherly, CEO of the T.J. Martell Foundation. Photo Credit Nick King NY

This week the T.J. Martell Foundation launched the Women of Influence Awards at Riverpark in New York.  The Foundation honored five incredible women from various business backgrounds: Marcie Allen, President of MAC Presents; Joann Camuti, Director, Sales Promotions and Community Relations, with American Airlines; Dr. Margaret I Cuomo, Author of A World Without Cancer: The Making of a New Cure and the Real Promise of Prevention; Liz Smith, famed Journalist, Columnist and Co-Founder of wowOwow.com; and Lori Stokes, ABC Eyewitness News Anchor.  Jenna Wolfe of NBC’s Today Show was the Mistress of Ceremonies and Grammy-Nominated recording artist Elle Varner performed a special song called “So Fly” for the women in the audience.

The event brought men and women from around the country together to support the honorees, have a great time, but most importantly, to raise awareness and funds for women’s cancer research programs through the great work of Dr. James Holland, Distinguished Professor of Neoplastic Diseases of Mt. Sinai Medical Center, and Dr.Jimmie Holland, Wayne E. Chapman Chair in Psychiatric Oncology of Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center.

Dr. Margaret I. Cuomo who recently published “A World Without Cancer” gave remarks to the audience highlighting key tips for early detection and cancer prevention.  Her address to the audience was heartfelt and made all of us feel strongly about taking better care of ourselves!

I have to say that as I reflect on the wonderful day at the T.J. Martell event, it made me realize that we ALL can be Women and Men of Influence.  We are the best advocates for encouraging our family, friends and colleagues to take better care of themselves by exercising, eating healthier, limiting alcohol intake, getting rest, don’t smoke and getting yearly medical exams.   It is the best medicine one can take to live a longer, healthier life.

Managing Breast Cancer Risk

October is Breast Cancer Awareness Month, and we are excited to feature several guest bloggers on this topic.  The first is Dr. James Holland, Distinguished Professor of Neoplastic Diseases  at Mount Sinai School of Medicine and the T.J. Martell Foundation’s Founding Research Scientist:

Every woman must think of breast cancer as a risk that can be managed better by attention than by negligence.

–  Starting at age 50 (and many think at age 40) mammograms are of great value in early diagnosis.

–  Other supplementary diagnostic methods include sonography and magnetic resonance imaging.

–  Self examination can help; professional examination is much better.

Early diagnosis markedly improves curability.

–  Although there are some known genetic predispositions, they account for less than one in ten breast cancers, and thus no woman is exempt.

– Although breast cancer occurs in men, the great preponderance in women establishes that estrogen is a critical component of its development.

– Post-menopausal hormonal replacement increases risk.

On prevention:

– Exercise is one preventive, and is free.

– Drugs that diminish estrogen effect on breast tissue, such as tamoxifen or raloxifen are valuable in women at high risk.

– We do not yet have a universal preventive, however.

Improved treatments:

– For early breast cancers removal of the entire breast is rarely needed.  Preservation of the breast is psychologically advantageous.

– After surgery, and sometimes even before, hormone therapy, radiation therapy,  chemotherapy and immunotherapy may all have roles to play in specific instances.

– Cure is possible most of the time, and even in the minority who are not cured, there are usually major benefits of treatment.

The day will come when we know how to prevent many if not most breast cancers without seriously compromising normal life (as has been true for lung cancer by tobacco avoidance, for skin cancer by sunshine avoidance, and for penile cancer by circumcision). Until then, alert attention, not fear, is the best path for today’s woman.

James F Holland MD
Distinguished Professor of Neoplastic Diseases
Mount Sinai School of Medicine