T.J. Martell Foundation on Today!


On Friday we celebrated our third annual Women of Influence New York. To kick off this exciting day, our host Robin Quivers, a cancer survivor herself, sat down with the team at the Today Show to tell them all about the event, which raised vital funds for breast cancer and ovarian cancer research. Here is the clip. Enjoy!

 

New Blood Test Shows Promise in Cancer Fight

In the usual cancer biopsy, a surgeon cuts out a piece of the patient’s tumor, but researchers in labs across the country are now testing a potentially transformative innovation. They call it the liquid biopsy, and it is a blood test that has only recently become feasible with the latest exquisitely sensitive techniques. It is showing promise in finding tiny snippets of cancer DNA in a patient’s blood.

“Liquid biopsies offer real promise. Sometimes even the tissue biopsy obtained by the surgeon can fail to show the mutation which will predict that a patient will have a good response to a targeted agent. Indeed, liquid biopsies may allow oncologists to predict the emergence of drug resistance even before a tumor grows on x-rays. A formidable new technology,” says Dr. Gregory Curt, Chairman of the T.J. Martell Foundation’s Scientific Advisory Committee.

For the full article in The New York Times, please click here.

Gene Mutations May Predict Melanoma Response to Immunotherapies

Douglas Johnson, M.D.

Christine Lovly, M.D., Ph.D.

Melanoma patients whose tumors test positive for mutations in the NRAS gene were more likely to benefit from new immunotherapy drugs, according to a new study led by Vanderbilt-Ingram Cancer Center (VICC) investigators.

Douglas Johnson, M.D., assistant professor of Medicine, and Christine Lovly, M.D., Ph.D., assistant professor of Medicine and Cancer Biology, are co-first authors of the study, conducted in conjunction with colleagues from Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center (MSKCC), New York, and Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH), Boston. The study was funded in part by the T.J. Martell Foundation and published in Cancer Immunology Research.

“We studied a small group of patients but the results were quite suggestive,” Johnson said. “This study highlights the need to find predictive markers that can help us understand which patients will respond to therapy.”

To read more, please click here.

Prostate Cancer Breakthrough at Mount Sinai Hospital

T.J. Martell Foundation-supported scientists have identified a “master regulator” gene driving aggressiveness in prostate cancer.

Scientists at Mount Sinai Hospital in New York, with the support of the T.J. Martell Foundation, have discovered a gene that acts as a switch and activates the aggressiveness of tumor cells. The discovery could have a major impact on the development of treatments for prostate cancer.

Prostate cancer is the most common tumor and one of the leading causes of cancer death in men. In about 10-15% of patients prostate cancer has an aggressive disease course characterized by the appearance of tumors in distant organs (metastasis) and the acquisition of resistance to anticancer drugs, which contributes to the death of most patients with prostate cancer.

The study, led by Dr. Josep Domingo-Domenech published and highlighted in the cover of the prestigious scientific journal Cancer Cell, describes a mechanism by which prostate cancer cells become aggressive and survive standard treatment. The key is a gene called GATA2, which encodes a transcription factor capable of reprogramming and activating aggressive cells through activation of multiple signaling pathways.

Using computational biology techniques that integrate genetic information from prostate cancer cells in humans and experimental models it has been possible to identify the master regulator gene GATA2. It was observed that experimental prostate cancer tumor cells with high levels of GATA2 initiated aggressive tumors that were resistant to chemotherapy. GATA2 gene acts as a master gene, controlling the activation and expression of many other genes. It activates other genes, putting them to work invading healthy tissue and initiating metastasis. Other genes are set to activate survival pathways that help initiate tumors and make cells resistant to anticancer drugs. This is the case for the gene coding the growth factor IGF2, which is activated directly by GATA2 triggering a signaling cascade that increases tumor cell survival under adverse conditions.

Importantly the discovery of the master gene, GATA2, that regulates expression of IGF2 led to the identification of a new therapeutic strategy for patients with prostate cancer. The new treatment strategy combines chemotherapy with IGF2 pathway inhibitors which improves the results of chemotherapy and allows more durable responses. Dr. Domingo- Domenech explains, ‘the combination of chemotherapy with IGF2 pathway inhibitors helps enhance the antitumor effect of chemotherapy and was well tolerated in animal models. Now we are looking forward to translate these studies into patients.”

“This important finding is a clear example of the excellent science with important clinical implications for cancer patients that the T.J. Martell Foundation is currently funding,” says Dr. James Holland, the founding research scientist for the T.J. Martell Foundation. The support that the T.J. Martell Foundation has given Dr. Domingo- Domenech during the last years is helping enormously to uncover new therapeutic targets against this devastating disease.

 

Rest In Peace

This weekend, longtime beloved ESPN anchor Stuart Scott lost his third bout with cancer, leaving behind two beautiful daughters and countless friends, family members, colleagues and fans across the country. He faced cancer with bravery and inspired many who also face the disease.

So today we choose to honor him by sharing what we think is his most touching quote about cancer and life: “When you die, it does not mean that you lose to cancer. You beat cancer by how you live, why you live and the manner in which you live.”

Stuart Scott was 49, and his journey through cancer treatment was detailed in The New York Times. “Over the years, he entertained us, and in the end, he inspired us — with courage and love. Michelle and I offer our thoughts and prayers to his family, friends, and colleagues,” said President Obama.

Congratulations are in Order!

Every year Billboard releases its prestigious list of Women In Music: The Most Powerful Executives in the Industry, and every year several of our board members are included for being “ground-breakers and game changers.” This year our board members Jody Gerson, Julie Swidler, Jennifer Breithaupt and Sharon Dastur as well as our New York Honors Gala honoree Marsha Vlasik were all listed. We are so honored to work with these incredibly hard-working women to continue our vital leukemia, cancer and AIDS research.

To read the full list, please visit billboard.com.