Internship Available

Admin/Event Planning Summer Internship Available in New York City
T.J. Martell Foundation East Coast Region

Internship Information

The T.J. Martell Foundation is a nonprofit organization dedicated to raising money for leukemia, cancer and AIDS research. Our internship program allows the opportunity to explore the administrative planning side events as well as interact with high and low profile music industry professionals. Interns assist with East Coast events such as the New York Golf Classic, Rock ‘n Bowl, New York Wine Dinner & Auction, Family Day, Martell in Miami, Women of Influence, the New Jersey Jazz Dinner and the Annual New York Honors Gala.

Internship Responsibilities

Responsibilities for this 2-3 day per week internship include:

  • Office administration duties
  • Assisting with event-related research (potential sponsors, venues, etc.)
  • Create event flyers
  • Monitor guests lists
  • Keep inventory of office needs
  • Research and outreach to in-kind and silent auction donors
  • Assisting at the Foundation’s events as needed
  • Other day-to-day office tasks and errands as needed

Preferred Skills

  • Proficient in all Office 365 programs
  • Excellent verbal and written communication skills
  • Professional attitude and the ability to work with a team

Requirements

  • Current university/college student eligible for internship credit

Please send all resumes, cover letters, and questions to:
Teresa Gaudio
T.J. Martell Foundation
Email: tgaudio@tjmartell.org

 

Rest in Peace

BobIt is with great sadness that the T.J. Martell Foundation announces the passing of longtime music industry executive Bob Heatherly and husband of the Foundation’s CEO, Laura Heatherly. A well-known personality in the music industry, Bob’s contagious personality and big smile was effortless. He left his mark on the country music industry and led the way for various artists who would later become household names. His career included positions at Columbia Records and as Vice President, Sales & Promotion for Atlantic Records, Nashville before joining Country Music icon Charley Pride in launching Music City Records. He served as President & CEO of Music City Records before retiring. Heatherly was often found by the side of his wife Laura as she tirelessly led the efforts for the T.J. Martell Foundation’s ground breaking cancer research and patient treatments. Bob Heatherly is a native of Newport, Arkansas but called Nashville his home for over 40 years. He is survived by his wife Laura and another love of his life, their dog Macy Gray. 

Visitation for Bob has been set for this Friday from 5:30 – 7pm, and there will be a graveside service on Saturday at 10am. Please click here for details. A Celebration of Life Service will be held on Monday, July 17 at 4 p.m. at Green Door Gourmet, The Grand Barn, 7007 River Road Pike, Nashville, TN 37209. In lieu of flowers, the family requests donations to the T.J. Martell Foundation.

We salute our volunteers!

As we close out National Volunteer Week, we’d like to take a moment to thank all of our volunteers nationwide. We are so grateful for all of your hard work, time, energy and dedication to our foundation’s mission of funding life-saving cancer and AIDS research.

Olga-Miss-USA-Headshot[1]Olga Litvinenko, President of the Next Generation, Junior Committee, has been involved in several events in the New York area. “I’m so grateful to volunteer with the T.J. Martell Foundation because we have a direct impact on those affected with cancer, leukemia and AIDS AND we have built a strong community of young professionals who are making a difference today for tomorrow.”

Through Olga’s leadership, the Next Generation has grown stronger every single year. Since day one, Olga has always gone the extra mile when helping the Foundation. We are fortunate to have her support and couldn’t do it without her!

Q&A with Women of Influence Honoree Stephanie Latham of Facebook

StephanieWhat does it mean to you to be chosen as a Woman of Influence by the T.J. Martell Foundation?

As a breast cancer survivor, daughter of a survivor and mother to a survivor the T.J. Martell Foundation supports a cause quite literally near to my heart.  I am honored to join the ranks of an inspiring group of women as we continue to drive toward a cure for future generations.

What piece of advice would you give to young women today to inspire them to follow their dreams?

Silence your inner critic. Be confident in who you are and what you know you can accomplish and don’t let anyone shake that from you.

What steps do you take to make health and wellness a priority in your life?

I am laser focused on my priorities and clear on that with all those around me both personally and professionally. My health and my family top that list always.

Stephanie Latham is Director of U.S. Automotive at Facebook and one of six outstanding honorees for this year’s Women of Influence New York on May 12th. For details and tickets, please click here.

Q&A With Dr. Scott Hiebert at Vanderbilt-Ingram Cancer Center

hiebert_scott_croppedThank you for attending our recent scientific research meeting. What was your top takeaway? One of the things that struck me was the success of using three drugs to combat HIV and how successful this approach has been. We use combination therapy in cancer, but rarely can we apply three drugs at once due to toxicity. This has to be our goal as using multiple drugs at once makes resistance less likely to occur.

Please tell us a little about your research funded by the T.J. Martell Foundation. The work funded at Vanderbilt spans most of the critical cancer types from breast cancer to lung cancer to leukemia. This work is aimed at not only making new drugs, but using the drugs we have in a smarter way.

Why and how did you begin doing this type of work? I got hooked in graduate school. I had a mentor in college who suggested graduate school and once I started discovering new information never before uncovered, I was hooked. We do “hypothesis” based research where we test our best guesses, so its a little like gambling and its easy to get hooked.

Why is the T.J. Martell Foundation’s continued support so important to your research? The support of the T. J. Martell Foundation supports every aspect of our work in that it allows us to try risky new experiments and develop new veins of discovery that would not be funded by the NIH.

What are some of the most important things people can do to decrease their cancer risk? Don’t smoke, eat a healthy diet, exercise, and screen, screen, screen—colonoscopy when you are 50, prostate and breast exams, and make sure that your kids and grandchildren get the HPV vaccine. This vaccine will prevent cervical cancer and half of head and neck cancers in men and women.

Dr. Scott Hiebert is Associate Director for Basic Science Research and Shared Resources, Hortense B. Ingram Professor of Cancer Research, Professor of Biochemistry, Associate Professor of Medicine, and Researcher at Vanderbilt-Ingram Cancer Center in Nashville.

Guest Blog Post by a Grateful Patient

My good friend, Lee Jay Berman, invited me to the wine-tasting dinner, which I was unable to attend, but he had explained the foundation’s mission.  When I received my diagnosis not long afterwards, he was one of the first people I called.  He alerted me to the T.J. Martell Foundation’s Patient Services program, or as he put it, “My friend Laura is CEO at T.J. Martell, and when she calls the administrator of a facility, they drop everything to take her call. She can really open doors. It has made a difference for other friends of mine. She sees it as another kind of mission for the foundation.”

My diagnosis was a rare but aggressive one, cholangiocarcinoma—cancer of the bile ducts leading out of the liver.  Two experienced surgeons in the field told me point blank that I wasn’t a candidate for surgery, which is the only thing that holds out hope of survival past a year or two.  Palliative care (chemo and radiation) was my only option.

I had been in touch with Memorial Sloan Kettering about getting a second (actually, third) opinion, specifically with one of their oncologists, since I was satisfied that surgery wasn’t possible.  After Laura’s call, I quickly got an appointment.  To my surprise, it was with a surgeon, one of the most distinguished surgeons for GI cancers in the world.  He told me that while I should start chemotherapy, I should not rule out the possibility of surgery later on.  I had an unusually good response to the chemo, and six months later he performed a resection operation.  Tests showed zero cancer at the margins, which holds out the possibility that I have been cured.

Perhaps I might have gotten that appointment without the referral.  But perhaps not.  MSK‘s policy was not to see someone like me at all once chemotherapy began, which was imminent.  The appointment was literally on three hours’ notice.  Without that appointment, I would have had chemo and radiation—and likely never have known surgery was an option.

How did the referral help me?  Possibly the difference between life or death.  At a minimum, as things turned out, it likely added years to my life.

There are many foundations fighting the battle against cancer.  T.J. Martell is focused on funding innovative research at top institutions pushing for real breakthroughs.  That’s the melody.  The human side of the foundation adds a harmony of personal kindness, reaching out to those stricken by cancer to make breakthroughs at an individual level possible.  Of that, I’m living proof.

Editor’s note: This patient has asked to remain anonymous, and we of course respect his wishes.

T.J. Martell Foundation Named to the 2016 Classy 100

classy-100_instaWe are proud to announce that the T.J. Martell Foundation made this year’s Classy 100 list, an annual compilation of the growing nonprofits on Classy, the world’s leading online fundraising platform for social enterprises. Classy released in February the 2016 Classy 100 using a proprietary growth score calculation as the basis for recognition. The organizations that represent the top one hundred growth organizations this year on Classy were generated through a calculated score that took into consideration revenue growth from three areas: monthly revenue growth on Classy above the platform baseline, year-over-year revenue growth on Classy, and overall revenue size on Classy.

“Scaling an organization is extremely hard work, whether you’re running a for-profit company or a nonprofit organization,” said Scot Chisholm, CEO and co-founder of Classy. “However, growth in the nonprofit sector isn’t celebrated in the same way as it is in the for-profit sector. At Classy we believe that revenue growth is an important metric for both sectors, as it represents the ability to attract and maintain new customers or supporters year over year. The Classy 100 represents a group of social good organizations who have experienced growth by delivering a world-class giving experience to their supporters year in and year out.”

To be included in the Classy 100, organizations needed to be transacting on Classy for at least January 2016—December 2016. Other criteria included at least $50K in revenue on Classy in 2016, counting transactions in all 12 months; at least $10K in revenue on Classy in 2015; and at least 25 percent year-over-year revenue growth on Classy from 2015 to 2016. The organizations recognized this year span all causes and sizes, bound together by their consistent revenue growth on the Classy platform.

About Classy

Classy is the world’s leading fundraising platform for social enterprises with the goal of solving social problems more effectively and efficiently. Since launching in 2011, Classy has helped more than 3,000 social enterprises including Oxfam, World Food Program USA, and National Geographic to raise hundreds of millions of dollars. Classy also hosts the Collaborative, a 3-days summit and awards ceremony, that brings together impactful social enterprises and celebrates achievements in the sector. Based in San Diego, CA, Classy employs a staff of over 200 people and was recognized by Fast Company in 2016 as one of the world’s 10 Most Innovative Companies for Social Good. Classy was also recognized by Entrepreneur Magazine as one of the 10 Most Brilliant Companies for Social Impact in 2016 and listed as a “Rising Star” in the first-ever Forbes Cloud 100 list in 2016. Classy is backed by investors including JMI, Mithril and Salesforce Ventures. For more information, visit www.classy.org or follow Classy on Twitter: @Classy.

A Very Sad Loss

Kitty Moon EmeryThe T.J. Martell Foundation is deeply saddened by the news that Kitty Moon Emery has passed away. She was a dear friend, mentor and one of the greatest women in our Nashville community. She was a special board member and volunteer for the T.J. Martell Foundation. Our hearts and prayers goes to her husband Pat during this sad time.

Patient Update: “I knew I would come out the other side just fine.”

Paul FitzpatrickWhen Paul was diagnosed with a rare form of lung cancer in 2008, he wasn’t sure where to turn. “It was quite a shock being diagnosed with cancer at 27, and I felt like I’d been thrown into completely uncharted waters. But the doctors who the T.J. Martell Foundation referred me to at Mount Sinai in Manhattan took fantastic care of me. It was clear from the start that they were the experts in their field. When another team first recommended an aggressive course of chemo that could have been debilitating, Dr. James Holland reviewed my case and recommended a less invasive course of oral chemo so I never missed a day of work because of side effects.”

That was almost nine years ago, and Paul is now in remission. At the time, his doctors were unsure what quality of life he would be able to maintain longterm. But he has since welcomed three beautiful children and a few summers ago he rode 105 miles to support cancer patients and survivors in his home state of Connecticut.

“I don’t want to trivialize anything, but looking back almost a decade later, it almost feels like a non-event,” says Paul. “Thanks to the talented people at the T.J. Martell Foundation, I knew from the beginning of this process that I would come out the other side just fine.”

 

Cancer and Collaboration

Levy_MiaOne of the bedrocks of our organization is encouraging collaboration between scientists and institutions. We feel strongly that we will find a cure faster when great minds work together. That is why we are so excited about this news from our partners at Vanderbilt-Ingram Cancer Center, who have joined an international consortium of leading cancer centers to share genomic data from patients in an effort to accelerate the pace of cancer research and improve precision medicine.

The American Association for Cancer Research (AACR) launched the AACR Project Genomics Evidence Neoplasia Information Exchange (GENIE) to facilitate data sharing among major cancer centers and researchers.

VICC’s participation in AACR Project GENIE has been spearheaded by Mia Levy, M.D., Ph.D., Ingram Assistant Professor of Cancer Research and director of Cancer Health Informatics and Strategy, pictured here.

“As physicians we are all generating massive amounts of data about patients and the genetic mutations in their tumors, along with patient response to medications and other treatments. But much of that data is kept in silos and has not been shared. AACR Project GENIE is one of the first efforts to make some of this data available for cancer researchers so that we can accelerate the pace of discovery,” Levy said.

Click here to read more.